Which is a somatic reflex?

A reflex arc is a neural pathway that controls a reflex. In vertebrates, most sensory neurons do not pass directly into the brain, but synapse in the spinal cord. There are two types: autonomic reflex arc (affecting inner organs) and somatic reflex arc (affecting muscles).

In this way, what is an example of a somatic reflex?

The somatic nervous system is the system that helps the body adjust to the external environment through the voluntary movement of the skeletal system. Some examples of the somatic nervous system include: the blinking reflex, knee jerk reflex, gag reflex, and the startle reflex and rooting reflex in infants.

What is the effector of the plantar reflex?

Reflex Tested Response Observed Effector Muscle Involved
Biceps Flexion of forearm at elbow joint or slight biceps twitch Biceps brachii
Triceps Extension of forearm at elbow joint or slight triceps twitch Triceps brachii
Plantar Plantar flexion of the foot and flexion of toes Gastrocnemius, soleus, and flexor digitorum longus

What is the difference between a somatic and autonomic reflex?

The autonomic nervous system regulates organ systems through circuits that resemble the reflexes described in the somatic nervous system. The main difference between the somatic and autonomic systems is in what target tissues are effectors. Somatic responses are solely based on skeletal muscle contraction.

What is an example of a somatic reflex?

The somatic nervous system is the system that helps the body adjust to the external environment through the voluntary movement of the skeletal system. Some examples of the somatic nervous system include: the blinking reflex, knee jerk reflex, gag reflex, and the startle reflex and rooting reflex in infants.

How do autonomic and somatic reflexes differ?

One difference between a somatic reflex, such as the withdrawal reflex, and a visceral reflex, which is an autonomic reflex, is in the efferent branch. The output of a somatic reflex is the lower motor neuron in the ventral horn of the spinal cord that projects directly to a skeletal muscle to cause its contraction.

What is the difference between a somatic and autonomic reflex?

The autonomic nervous system regulates organ systems through circuits that resemble the reflexes described in the somatic nervous system. The main difference between the somatic and autonomic systems is in what target tissues are effectors. Somatic responses are solely based on skeletal muscle contraction.

What is the cranial reflex?

Other spinal reflexes involve more than one synapse (see polysynaptic reflex); an example is the withdrawal reflex of the hand from a painful stimulus (such as fire). Cranial reflexes are mediated by pathways in the cranial nerves and brain; examples are the blinking and swallowing reflexes. See also conditioning.

What is a somatic reflex?

There are two types of reflex arcs:the autonomic reflex arc, affecting inner organs, and the somatic reflex arc, affecting muscles. When a reflex arc consists of only two neurons, one sensory neuron, and one motor neuron, it is defined as monosynaptic.

What is the difference between a somatic and visceral reflex?

Visceral reflexes are reflexes that occur in the soft tissue organs of the body, such as the digestive and reproductive system. The somatic nervous system is part of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Somatic reflexes involve a skeletal muscle contracting in response to a stimuli.

Are somatic reflexes involuntary?

The somatic nervous system (SoNS) is the part of the peripheral nervous system associated with the voluntary control of body movements through the skeletal muscles and mediation of involuntary reflex arcs.

What type of reflex causes blinking?

The corneal reflex, also known as the blink reflex, is an involuntary blinking of the eyelids elicited by stimulation of the cornea (such as by touching or by a foreign body), though could result from any peripheral stimulus.

Is the gag reflex autonomic or somatic?

Cards
Term Somatic Reflexes are Definition 1)Abdominal Reflex 2)Achilles Reflex 3)Corneal Reflex 4)Crossed-Extensor Reflex 5)Gag Reflex 6)Plantar Reflex 7)Patellar Reflex
Term Autonomic Reflexes are Definition 1)Ciliospinal Reflex 2)Pupillary Light Reflex
Term Ciliospinal Reflex Definition Sympathetic

What do you mean by reflex action?

A reflex, or reflex action, is an involuntary and nearly instantaneous movement in response to a stimulus. The reflex is then an automatic response to a stimulus that does not receive or need conscious thought.
The somatic nervous system is part of the peripheral nervous system. Major functions of the somatic nervous system include voluntary movement of the muscles and organs and reflex movements. In the process of voluntary movement, sensory neurons carry impulses to the brain and the spinal cord.

What is the ipsilateral reflex?

When a loud sound enters a normal ear, the stapedius muscle will contract on both sides regardless of which ear is stimulated. Therefore, the ART is a bilateral (“two side”) reflex. Third, the word ipsilateral (ipsi) means “same side” and contralateral (contra) means “opposite side”.

What tissue is in the effector?

1. As defined by Sherrington, a peripheral tissue that receives nerve impulses and reacts by muscular contractioon, glandular secretion, or electric discharge (from an electric organ, as in the case of certain bony fishes such as the electric eel). 2.
A reflex is a rapid, involuntary response to a stimulus. A reflex arc is the pathway traveled by the nerve impulses during a reflex. Most reflexes are spinal reflexes with pathways that traverse only the spinal cord.
Reflex action Stimulus Receptors
Pupil reflex Light intensity Rods and cones
Knee jerk Tapping patellar tendon Proprioceptors/ . tendon stretch receptors
Sweating Increased body temperature Thermoreceptors
Coughing and sneezing. Irritant material on mucosa of airways Chemoreceptors

Is Polysynaptic reflex faster than Monosynaptic?

Monosynaptic reflexes, because of the more direct connection, are faster than polysynaptic reflexes.

What is the minimum number of neurons that can be involved in a reflex?

What is the minimum number of neurons that can make up a “reflex arc” 2. What would the neurons be that make up a reflex arc? There must be at least one sensory neuron and at least one motor neuron.

What is an extensor reflex?

The crossed extensor reflex is a withdrawal reflex. When the reflex occurs the flexors in the withdraw
ing limb contract and the extensors relax, while in the other limb, the opposite occurs. The crossed extensor reflex is contralateral, meaning the reflex occurs on the opposite side of the body from the stimulus.

What is the stretch reflex?

The stretch reflex (myotatic reflex) is a muscle contraction in response to stretching within the muscle. It is a monosynaptic reflex which provides automatic regulation of skeletal muscle length. When a muscle lengthens, the muscle spindle is stretched and its nerve activity increases.

What are the two main parts of the central nervous system?

The central nervous system (CNS) controls most functions of the body and mind. It consists of two parts: the brain and the spinal cord.